Air superiority fighter

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Lessons in combat: On second thoughts, deleting the word is better

← Previous revisionRevision as of 02:04, 21 June 2013
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===Lessons in combat===
 
===Lessons in combat===
Combat experiences during the [[Vietnam War]] proved BVR proponents wrong in their assumption that they would never ever need to resort to WVR combat. Owing to restrictive [[rules of engagement]] and the failings of 1960s missile and radar technology, combat often comprised close-range dog-fights, one for which American fighters and pilots were unprepared. The lessons from this conflict spurred a rethinking of design priorities for fighter aircraft, in which the U.S. Navy's [[TOPGUN]] and the U.S. Air Force's [[Red Flag (USAF)|Red Flag]] programs, developed specifically to teach pilots the lessons of [[dogfight]]ing, were created.
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Combat experiences during the [[Vietnam War]] proved BVR proponents wrong in their assumption that they would never need to resort to WVR combat. Owing to restrictive [[rules of engagement]] and the failings of 1960s missile and radar technology, combat often comprised close-range dog-fights, one for which American fighters and pilots were unprepared. The lessons from this conflict spurred a rethinking of design priorities for fighter aircraft, in which the U.S. Navy's [[TOPGUN]] and the U.S. Air Force's [[Red Flag (USAF)|Red Flag]] programs, developed specifically to teach pilots the lessons of [[dogfight]]ing, were created.
  
 
In order to maximize their combat effectiveness and strategic usefulness, air superiority fighters usually operate under the control/co-ordination of an [[Airborne Early Warning and Control]] (AEW&C) aircraft.
 
In order to maximize their combat effectiveness and strategic usefulness, air superiority fighters usually operate under the control/co-ordination of an [[Airborne Early Warning and Control]] (AEW&C) aircraft.